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Your boss Is debating whether or not you can watch the World Cup at work

By Jo Constantz

08 Dec 2022 · 5 min read

Editor's Note

"You're a grown-up. You don't have to hide that you're watching the World Cup." Bloomberg explains how managers are allowing employees to behold the beautiful game—as long as the work gets done.

As World Cup matches play out in dramatic fashion, captivating international attention and even slowing trading volumes on Wall Street, bosses across the globe are faced with a dilemma: Whether or not to let their employees watch at work.

With a projected 5 billion viewers - more than half the world's population - and many matches played during working hours, the 28-day event has some implications for the working world. Almost 40% of the World Cup hours overlap with work in the U.K. - defined as Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. local time - and almost half conflict with U.S. business hours, according to an analysis by software company InvGate.

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