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Why is Germany’s far right surging?

By Helmut K. Anheier

16 Aug 2023 · 4 min read

informed Summary

  1. Over the last two years, Germany's largest far-right party, the Alternative für Deutschland (AfD), has managed to unite the country’s nationalist fringe groups under the leadership of Björn Höcke. The party is now positioning itself as a united force ready to take on government responsibilities.

BERLIN – Over the last two years, Germany’s largest far-right party, the Alternative für Deutschland (AfD), has managed to consolidate the numerous splinter groups that comprise the country’s long-unsettled nationalist fringe. Defying its reputation for infighting and frequent leadership turnovers, the AfD has come to be dominated by a single figure, Björn Höcke. While Germany’s political mainstream still treats the party as a pariah, the AfD is seeking to present itself as a united force ready to take on government responsibilities.

Höcke, who heads the AfD’s branch in Germany’s eastern state of Thuringia, rose to prominence as the spiritus rector of the party’s most extremist wing, known as der Flügel (the wing). Today, this radical nationalist grouping – whose neo-Nazi rhetoric attracted the close scrutiny of the Bundesnachrichtendienst, Germany’s federal intelligence agency – has been dissolved, and Höcke has become the de facto leader of an even more radical AfD.

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